There's more to life at Bethel than classes & seminars

Beyond the green is a place students to share the joys and hardships of being a Thresher.

  • Mudslam, AKA The Dirtiest Volleyball You Have Ever Played

    Mudslam, AKA The Dirtiest Volleyball You Have Ever Played

  • Mod Life: Finding Fun Amidst Stress

    Mod Life: Finding Fun Amidst Stress

The End of a Tennis Season

The End of a Tennis Season

This past weekend were the conference tournaments for the men's and women's tennis teams. Unfortunately, neither team made it to nationals but that does not discount the great and successful seasons they had.
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Pirates Of Penzance

Pirates Of Penzance

Over the past month many of Bethel’s students have been working on the opera, The Pirates of Penzance.
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Bubbert Awards 2014

Bubbert Awards 2014

This year’s Bubberts Awards were on the evening of April 12th. Bubberts was great as always! Everyone looked super spiffy and fancy.
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Concert Choir In Europe

Concert Choir In Europe

The Concert Choir gave a bittersweet farewell to our European choir tour with a final concert on Sunday, this time in front of the friendly faces of Bethel’s campus.
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Interterm on Campus

Interterm at Bethel this year is slightly different for me than it has been for the last couple of years.  Two years ago, I took a travel trip to Costa Rica, last year, Jerusalem.  So this year, I’m staying on campus.  Kind of anticlimactic, right?  Especially since five of the eight girls in my mod are on travel trips to Africa and Europe.  While it’s definitely true that Interterm on campus is not quite as hustle-and-bustle as walking through an African village, visiting the Dome of the Rock, seeing the birthplace of math and science, or sharing a space with monkeys and brightly-colored birds, but there are still plenty of opportunities to connect with friends and learn something at the same time!

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An Adventure in Africa!

“It smells like Africa!” Mariah exclaimed on the first night we were here. And yes, it does- as hard as it is to believe, we are really in Africa. After an almost-15 hour flight, we landed in South Africa and were immediately impressed by the fresh air and vastness of this beautiful place. The next morning, we made our trek into Lesotho. I was the first one to be sick in Africa (which is very fun while traveling). Bill only turned on the windshield wipers five times, although it didn’t seem to be raining…(everything is on the opposite side here, so turn signals can easily be confused with the windshield wiper switch).

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January 8th

This was a busy day of worship, wonder at what we were observing–and some winter in the form of continued chilly weather–a daily high in the upper ’20s!

At 7:50 AM we were in our bus and headed for the 8:30 service at the large Chong Wen Men Church in central Beijing. The church was established in 1870 when it was called Asbury Church–the first church constructed by American Methodists in northern China.  Like many churches across China, this one was closed to Christian service during the Cultural Revolution (1966-76) when it served the state as middle school. It was opened in 1982 and now holds five services on Sundays–four in Mandarin and one in Korean.  About 3,000 believers are, as the church literature states, “plugged into ” church activities here. Some 300 new believes are baptized each year.  Additional to the Sunday AM services, the church sponsors a Bile study on Tuesday, a “Spiritual Growth meeting” on Wednesday, prayer meeting on Thursday and “sisters’ and “youth” fellowships on Friday. The church complex also includes a book store where Bibles (all Chinese; Chinese-English, etc.) are available at reasonable prices. We also saw CD’s, “Songs of Love” by the church choir for a reasonable RMB 10 (about $1.30) each, a few of which our group purchased.

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January 7th

This is Saturday and a day dedicated to some serious sight-seeing–the Great Wall, a jade carving factory and retail outlet, the Ming Tombs. Overnight a light snow had fallen in the city but this did not significantly impede traffic. The temperature was in the mid-20s as we began our 25-mile drive north to what Astronaut Neal Armstrong callled the “only man-made strcture” he could see from his space craft. Our BC group was in high spirits to see what was probably the touristic highlight of this Interterm adventure. The common saying in China is “One hasn’t seen China until one see the Great Wall!”

On this cold, gray day, with light snow continuing to fall, tourist traffic to/at the Great Wall was lighter than usual. This structure, undulating like huge a dragon across the mountainous terrain of north China, dates from abut 200 BC and at one time snaked over some 3,000 miles from the Gobi Desert in Western China to its eastern terminus on the shores of the East China Sea.  Today only a small length of the Wall has been rebuilt. The part we were visiting was characterized by high, unevenly-spaced steps–some as high as one’s knee–and proving a particular challenge to the short of stature! The Wall-perhaps 25 feet high and 30 feet wide at the top–is a breathtaking achievement!  It is believed that as many as one million workers (perhaps 20% of China’s population at the time)  labored in its construction.

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January 6th

Day 4 of our Middle Kingdom adventure!  Beijing weather this morning was typical early January–no snow, but chilly, with morning lows of 16-18 degrees F. and a modest breeze from the NW. The overall health of the group was very good–probably a solid 8.5 ranking on a scale of 10 signifying perfect health and 1 a near-death situation!

This was the first day of our “business/economics” related meetings. Enroute to our first meeting with the American Chamber of Commerce, Guide Bill spoke of the growing problem of educated unemployed in China–of the 2010 university graduating class, no more than about 50% had secured jobs within the first year after graduation. Our Chamber meeting was held on the 6th floor of a gleaming newish glass and steel office complex in Beijing’s central business district. Our host, Mr. Matt Wisla, Vice-president of the Chamber for Communications and a 7-year “veteran” of his work here, provided a very fine overview of the structure, objectives and modaliteis of the American Chamber in China. He noted some 1,200 US companies now operate here, ranging from the “big boys” (General Motors; Caterpillar, etc.) to the small companies seeking market niches to source local production for manufacturing operations in the US.  The overall objective of the Chamber was “To help US businesses succeed in China”.  He spoke of the Chamber’s work in advocacy, networking with US and Chinese interests, and provision of information relating to the Chinese business environment. With regard to the latter he spoke of an annual “white paper” comprising some 30 chapters and 400 pp. with assessments and recommendations useful to American business operating in, or contemplating operations in, China. He mentioned close cooperation with the American Embassy in Beijing–with recently-departed Ambassador Jon Huntsman and newly-appointed Ambassador Gary Locke.

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January 5th

This was the day to learn more of Beijing, the new and the old. The hotel morning call came promptly at 7, then a nice Asian-oriented breakfast on the 2nd floor of the Rainbow.  Customers in the coffee shop included Chinese (perhaps 70% of the total) who were in Beijing on business or here to celebrate the upcoming Chinese New Year–the Year of the Dragon– and international tourists. Offerings included an abundance of fresh vegetables, variations on the egg, several types of bread including the steam buns that are a feature in most north China breakfasts.  My impression was that the vegetarians among our group would find plenty to eat at this breakfast!

By 8:30 AM were aboard Driver Liu’s bus for a 15-minute ride through heavy traffic to the Temple of Heaven–a standard item on the Beijing tourist visit and an increasingly popular site for local Chinese, many of them retired, who came to these spacious grounds to play cards or dominos, to sing–with a new emphasis on 1950s revolutionary songs–do aerobics to rather bouncy music and even some social dancing with limited touching! Despite a very chilly, 15-degree morning, but windless and with brilliant sunshine, we were surprised to see the large of Chinese who came out for these activities.

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January 3-4: Wichita-Chicago-Beijing

Friends and Family:

What I expect to follow is a series of rather brief, informal notes, hopefully prepared on a daily basis as time permits, coming out our January 2012 Bethel College Interterm experience in China.

The theme of this first-ever BC Interterm to the “Middle Kingdom” is a focus on the business and economic enviornment of this fast-developing country, with time taken to see some of its incomparable tourist attractions in and near Beijing, Shanghai and the lesser known sites of Puyang and Daming–locales where Mennonite missionaries served in the 1920- to about 1948 when they were expelled by China’s new communist government. Comments on my comments are always welcome at sgoering@juno.com I alone take full responsibility for any errors of fact, interpretation or judgment of which there will undoubtedly be some!

The substantive content of this Interterm experience is part of Bethel’s Cross Cultural Learning experiences and was developed by Dr. Allison McFarland, Chair of the Bethel’s Economics and Finance Department. The Bethel entourage included, in addition to Dr. McFarland, Bethel’s President Perry White and his wife, Dalene, Jake Goering of the North Newton Community, my wife, Shirley and me and Bethel students Dustin Abrahams, Sean Classen, Jordan Esau, Rachel Evans, Emily Harder, Kyle Howard, Jenae Janzen, Arthur Kauffman, Doug Kliewer, Abram Rodenberg, Matt Shelly and Paul Voran. Perhaps based on travel and living experience in China, Bethel had kindly invited Shirley and me to “facilitate” this initiative.

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The End has Come!!!…sorta

Well, it has been one whirlwind of a semester (a fact that has resulted in many things falling through the cracks, especially my blog posts)! With the end finally here and only 2 more finals to take, I can’t describe my feelings as anything less than thrilled—thrilled to go home, thrilled to relax, thrilled to move on to something new. It’s at the end of the semester, though, that I can’t help but think about what I’ve experienced and what is to come.

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Finals Week = Food Week!!!

One of the few good things about Finals Week is that suddenly, everyone wants to feed you!  In the past two days, I have eaten one church-sponsored meal, two meals at the houses of professors, two Bethel sponsored snack bars, and one evening of snacks and kittens at a friend’s house.  This does not include the care packages and random food offerings that have suddenly popped up in our mod, the third meal at a professor’s house that is going to happen tomorrow evening, or the “study break” snack bars offered in the mod’s main lounge.  It’s just great.

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Walkin’ in a Winter Wonderland

…except there’s no snow. Yet.

It’s “officially” winter here at Bethel, even though technically winter isn’t for another two weeks. Since we’re only here for four more days, though, winter has been these two weeks since Thanksgiving. We went straight from “Why are you playing Christmas music before Thanksgiving?’ to “Hurry up and do all the Christmas stuff because we aren’t here much longer!”

Besides Gala, the Christmas celebrations include Lighting of the Green and various singing opportunities at Chapel and and Mojo’s. Lighting of the Green is a 26-year old Bethel tradition that involves turning off the outside lamps on campus and making a human advent wreath with candles around the Green at the center of campus. It’s a really beautiful event to participate in.

Despite the fact that celebration is in the air, there’s also panic in the air. Finals have set in, and they’re not leaving until Friday. The library is far more popular than it has been all year and so is Mojo’s. Food is everywhere, provided by professors, Student Life and care packages from home or church. We’ll all make it through, but this week will be rough.